Optoelectronics

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Imaging technique reveals the secrets of 17th century paintings

Imaging technique reveals the secrets of 17th century paintings
The secrets of 17th century artists can now be revealed, thanks to 21st century signal processing. Using modern high-speed scanners and the advanced signal processing techniques, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are peering through layers of pigment to see how painters prepared their canvasses, applied undercoats, and built up layer upon layer of paint to produce their masterpieces.
21st November 2017

Devices could be used as flexible connectors for electronics

Devices could be used as flexible connectors for electronics
Researchers at MIT and several other institutions have developed a method for making photonic devices — similar to electronic devices but based on light rather than electricity — that can bend and stretch without damage. The devices could find uses in cables to connect computing devices, or in diagnostic and monitoring systems that could be attached to the skin or implanted in the body, flexing easily with the natural tissue.
8th November 2017

Scanning tunnelling microscope for magnetic atoms

Scanning tunnelling microscope for magnetic atoms
Philosophers in ancient Greece already believed that matter is made up of atoms. Only about 35 years ago, however, were atoms actually observed for the first time – in Zurich. The scanning tunnelling microscope developed by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer allowed surfaces of materials to be investigated with a spatial resolution of less than one nanometre – enough to see individual atoms.
7th November 2017


Optoelectronics works without glass

Optoelectronics works without glass
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed the first opto-electronic circuit component that works without glass and is instead made of metal. The component, referred to as a modulator, converts electrical data signals into optical signals. It is smaller and faster than current modulators, and much easier and cheaper to make. Optical components for microelectronics must be made of glass.
3rd November 2017

Hungary’s largest ever projection mapping presentation

Hungary’s largest ever projection mapping presentation
Earlier this year, the 17th FINA World Championships took place in Budapest. The event welcomed nearly 2,500 sportsmen and sports women and 350,000 visitors, making it the biggest sporting event in Hungary’s history. The opening ceremony also saw Hungary’s largest-ever presentation using projection mapping – which was created by Ferenc Varga of Visualpower kft using CAST Software’s wysiwyg lighting design and previsualisation software.
1st November 2017

Lens trick doubles odds for quantum interaction

Lens trick doubles odds for quantum interaction
It's not easy to bounce a single particle of light off a single atom that is less than a billionth of a metre wide. However, researchers at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore have shown they can double the odds of success, an innovation that might be useful in quantum computing and metrology. The findings were published in Nature Communications.
31st October 2017

Traps for light with tiny ink droplets

Traps for light with tiny ink droplets
  A microscopic 'pen' that is able to write structures small enough to trap and harness light using a commercially available printing technique could be used for sensing, biotechnology, lasers, and studying the interaction between light and matter.
24th October 2017

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light
Researchers have discovered a new way to produce high energy photon beams. The new method makes it possible to produce these gamma rays in a highly efficient way, compared with today's technique. The obtained energy is a billion times higher than the energy of photons in visible light. These high intensity gamma rays significantly exceed all known limits, and pave the way towards new fundamental studies.
20th October 2017

The light at the end of electronics’ dark tunnel is photonics

The light at the end of electronics’ dark tunnel is photonics
Scientists at Heriot-Watt University have reported they are one step closer to technology that could result in electrons being replaced with photons, solving the looming ‘speed limit’ for electronic gadgets. According to Dr Marcello Ferrera, an assistant professor in Photonics and Optics at Heriot-Watt, electronics have had such long-term success mainly due to how much smaller devices have become, and how robust they are, even when made from a very limited number of fundamental materials.
6th October 2017

Tracking live brain activity with NeuBtracker

Tracking live brain activity with NeuBtracker
A team of scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has successfully developed a new type of microscope. The so-called NeuBtracker is an open source microscope that allows to observe neuronal activities of zebrafish without perturbing their behaviour. This is opening up completely new perspectives for science, because now it will be possible to track natural behaviour while simultaneously imaging neuronal activity in the brain.
3rd October 2017


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CES 2018
9th January 2018
United States of America Las Vegas, Nevada
Developing wearable products: technology and opportunities
17th January 2018
United Kingdom Cocoon Networks, London
Smart Mobility Executive Forum
12th February 2018
Germany Berlin
embedded world 2018
27th February 2018
Germany Nuremberg
Industry 4.0 Summit 2018
28th February 2018
United Kingdom Manchester